Marines Magazine

The Official Magazine of the United States Marine Corps

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F-35 Joint Strike Fighter

The Marine Corps aviation family is all smiles.

The Corps landed on a new aircraft — a single-engine, single-passenger, multi-role, stealth-capable, fifth generation supersonic strike fighter — the F-35 Lightning II, commonly known as the Joint Strike Fighter.

The F-35 Lightning II, commonly known as the Joint Strike Fighter.

The F-35 Lightning II, commonly known as the Joint Strike Fighter.

The world’s first supersonic and radar-evading stealth aircraft with short take-off and vertical landing capabilities.

The JSF was developed by Lockheed Martin as part of their Joint Strike Fighter Program. Lockheed Martin produced three variants of the aircraft and the Marine Corps is getting the F-35B, the short take-off vertical landing variant.

The jet will become the primary aircraft fighter for the Marine Corps once it’s in the Corps’ air arsenal. It’s slated to replace the Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet and EA-6B Prowler, and the Corps’ AV-8B Harrier II.

The JSF’s next generation stealth, superb situational awareness and reduced vulnerability will make the F-35 hard to find,  hard to hit and hard to kill.

The JSF’s next generation stealth, superb situational awareness and reduced vulnerability will make the F-35 hard to find, hard to hit and hard to kill.

Maj. Joseph “O.D.” Bachmann became the first Marine to pilot the F-35 in a developmental test flight at the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics plant in Fort Worth, Texas, March 19. He said the F-35 can do everything the Marine Corps’ legacy fighter jets can do, “but cheaper and better.”

One of the F-35’s best of many capabilities is stealth, he added. This will be the first time the Corps will have a stealth aircraft, which according to Marine officials, will make the Marines adapt to new warfighting tactics.

The F-35B is the world’s first supersonic and radar-evading stealth aircraft with short take-off and vertical landing capabilities. The aircraft can operate from a variety of ships, roads and austere bases.

“When the F-35 gets fielded, the rest of the world can’t turn a blind eye to our force being stealth,” said Bachmann. “[The enemy] won’t ever know we’re coming. It’s awesome.”

Operation support cost is also reduced with the F-35. According to Lockheed Martin, the F-35B will provide unequaled multi-mission capability with a fraction of the support required by other fighter jets.

“This aircraft and its game-changing capabilities are going to offer Marine and joint force commanders on the front lines the most affordable and technologically-advanced fifth-generation aircraft in the world,” said Marine Corps Deputy Commandant for Aviation Lt. Gen. George Trautman.

The three F-35 variants were derived from a common design developed together. Using the same sustainment infrastructure worldwide, the F-35 will replace at least 13 types of aircraft for 11 nations initially, making the aircraft the most cost-effective fighter program in history, according to a Lockheed Martin press release.

Doug Pearson, vice president of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Test Force, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, stressed that when Marines operate all around the world in the ugliest situations, they need to be able to call upon a “survival machine” to go into harm’s way, survive and be effective. And that’s what the F-35 is designed to do.

The JSF is highly lethal in air-to-ground precision strikes in all weather and in air-to-air combat engagements.

The JSF is highly lethal in air-to-ground precision strikes in all weather and in air-to-air combat engagements.

“We’re diligently working to keep our edge,” said Pearson. “God forbid we ever have a major conflict. But if we do, we need [this aircraft] and we need it to be swift.”

Bachmann sees the most important role of the aircraft is its benefit to the Marine walking point in a combat zone, when it’s dark, scary and the enemy is near. There’s a strike fighter that’ll be in the air that’s lethal, stealthy and it will kill the enemy before they know they’re being watched, he illustrated.
“For the Marine that’s out on the front all by himself, he’s going to have a higher level of protection behind him,” he said.

The whole point of the production of the aircraft was to protect the Marines on the ground — the grunts, said Staff Sgt. Ben Tchinski, an aviation ordinance technician and an F-35 basic maintainer with integrated test force out of Patuxent River, Md.

“The Joint Strike Fighter will save more lives and kill more bad guys,” he said.

The aircraft is scheduled to fly with the Marine Corps in 2012. In April 2010, Marine Fighter/Attack Training Squadron 501 will officially stand up as part of the Joint Integrated Training Center located at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The Marine Corps is scheduled to have its first operational squadron in 2012, stationed at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz.

“The Marine Corps opted to wait more than ten years for this multi-role aircraft rather than invest billions of dollars in legacy upgrades that offer only marginal incremental improvement in operational performance at high cost,” Trautman said. “We didn’t want something ‘a little better.’ We wanted an aircraft that will allow us to leverage technologies that have improved tremendously over the past few years. The F-35 is an aircraft that can perform a wide variety of missions across the full range of military operations far better than any other aircraft flying anywhere today.”


The MV-22B osprey
MARINE CORPS AIR GROUND COMBAT CENTER TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. - Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 46 hook an M-777 Lightweight Howitzer to an MV-22B Osprey during an airlift operation at Landing Zone Sandhill aboard the Combat Center’s training area.

MARINE CORPS AIR GROUND COMBAT CENTER TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. - Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 46 hook an M-777 Lightweight Howitzer to an MV-22B Osprey during an airlift operation at Landing Zone Sandhill aboard the Combat Center’s training area.

The MV-22B Osprey is a tiltrotor vertical/short take-off and landing, multi-mission aircraft developed to fill multi-service combat operational requirements. The Osprey was built to replace the Marine Corps CH-46E and CH-53D, both troop-carrying helicopters.

The tiltrotor design combines the vertical flight capabilities of a helicopter with the speed and range of a turboprop airplane and permits aerial refueling and worldwide self deployment.

Due to its range, payload flexibility and speed, the Osprey provides the Corps with a multi-engine, dual piloted, self-deployable, medium lift, vertical take-off and landing aircraft used to conduct combat, combat support, combat service support, and special operations missions worldwide.

Lt. Gen. George J. Trautman, deputy commandant for Marine Corps Aviation, said in a “DoD Live” bloggers conference that when deployed to Iraq, the aircraft completed every assigned mission, and it did so “flying faster, farther and with safer flight profiles than any other assault support aircraft in the history of military operations.”


ABOARD USS BOXER - A crew chief assigned to Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 163 prepares the UH -1Y Venom to conduct a training exercise preparing the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit for a regularly scheduled deployment.

ABOARD USS BOXER - A crew chief assigned to Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 163 prepares the UH -1Y Venom to conduct a training exercise preparing the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit for a regularly scheduled deployment.

The UH-1Y Venom

The Marine Corps welcomed the newest version of utility helicopter in August 2009, with the introduction of the Bell UH-1Y Venom. Also called the Super Huey, the UH-1Y is a twin-engine medium size utility helicopter produced to meet the stringent requirements of the Marine Corps.

The aircraft’s design brings together the UH-1N airframe reliability, with a new four-bladed rotor system and fully integrated weapons, avionics and communications systems.

The UH-1Y Venom is equipped to meet many mission requirements including command and control, escort, reconnaissance, troop transport, medical evacuation and close air support. It was flying on deployment operations six months later when it deployed with the 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

The UH-1Y Upgrade Program replaced the UH-1N, doubling the range and payload, providing significant improvements in reliability and maintainability. Delivery of 123 aircraft is scheduled to be completed by 2016.

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  • Anonymous

    Not so great to be a young or aspiring NFO.

  • Scott Wothe

    Great time to be a young aviator!

  • ILPuller

    TAPPS
    JOLLy good show
    semper paras

  • patrick lantz

    keep up the good work