Marines Magazine

The Official Magazine of the United States Marine Corps

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Dedication and Sacrifice

Sgt. Kenneth Conde, Jr., (center) stands with his fellow Marines in Iraq in 2004. Conde received a gunshot wound in April, but refused to leave his Marines. Two months later, he was killed by an improvised explosive device July 1, 2004. 

The Marine Corps is full of extraordinary people who are willing to do whatever it takes in the name of freedom and the ones they love. In 2004, one Marine, Sgt. Kenneth Conde, Jr., demonstrated how much he was willing to sacrifice.

April 6, 2004, Conde, a Marine with 3rd Mobile Assault Platoon, Mobile Assault Company, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, was deployed to Ar Ramadi, Iraq when he and his unit were ordered to evacuate two casualties from Company G.

Family members of Sgt. Kenneth Conde, Jr., were in attendance May 13, 2011 at the dedication ceremony for Conde Hall. The Staff Noncommissioned Officer Academy building at Marine Corps University now bears the name of this brave Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Kuande Hall)

When Conde and his platoon reached the casualty evacuation site they were ambushed from all directions. Without hesitation Conde took the lead, defeating two enemy combatants. As he and his squad made forward progress, they again started to receive heavy enemy fire. This time Conde was wounded.

“I was running and I watched as I got shot in the left shoulder,” Conde said. “I remember seeing a red mist coming from my back.”

Despite being wounded, Conde continued to fight, killing another enemy combatant before falling to the ground. He managed to rise to his feet and fired several rounds at the enemy before falling again.

Marines and their corpsman provided medical care to Conde. After they treated his wounds, Conde insisted on gearing up and going back to the fight alongside his Marines.

For the next few days Conde remained by the side of his fellow Marines for several more firefights. The only time he stood down was when he was unable to hold his rifle steady because his arm went numb from his gunshot wound.

When Conde returned to camp, the Marines asked him why he chose to stay and fight. His response was, “I couldn’t just leave the fight when I still could keep going.

Friends, family members and fellow Marines gather for the dedication ceremony for Conde Hall May 13, 2011. The Staff Noncommissioned Officer Academy building was named in honor of the sacrifice of Sgt. Kenneth Conde, Jr., who gave his life for his country April 6, 2004. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Kuande Hall)

Conde refused to go home as a result of his shoulder injury and decided to finish his tour in Iraq. On July 1, 2004, almost two months after being shot, Conde was killed in action by an improvised explosive device while on patrol with his Marines.

Conde was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star with V for his actions. His citation reads, ‘his leadership, before, during and after the battle, symbolizes all that we have come to expect from a noncommissioned officer.’

In honor of his sacrifice, the Staff Noncommissioned Officer Academy building at the Marine Corps University now carries his name – as a standing tribute to his dedication.

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  • Terry Bond

    Sgt. as you join our brothers guarding the Pearly Gates know that the rest of us are coming to reinforce you as we all spent our time in hell.

  • Bob Lassiter

    Long list of Marine HERO’s!

  • Lizzette Santiago

    Just brings tear to my eyes how these brave young men & women every day protect us from the enemy… with out hesitation .. God Bless them all & the familes that support them always  and near leave thier side… Thank you Sgt Kenneth Conde  all that you have done for us.. Semper Fi … 

  • Marinemomkaren

    To his family, we are sorry for your loss, and we will forever remember and be grateful for his sacrifice. Your Marine family will continue to keep you in our prayers.

  • Alexandro Torres

    Even thou I never met you we both share the same uniform and rank. Keep watch over your loved ones and to the Corps. Until we meet. Semper Fi.

    Sgt. Torres

  • David Kane

    So shall be Conde.

  • David Kane

    So long is death of love remembered.  My cousin suffered an accident  where his head got rolled over and the school system named the gymnasium after his nickname to carry on a legacy.  He’s written not only in the book of the lamb but also a brick F’n wall.  

  • Richard Torres58

    The best of us,Semper Fi

  • Sgt. Claas

    Semper Fi

  • Cpl Kern sutherland

    RIP SGT Conde SEMPER FI thnank you for you service may God be with you and your family

  • Cusechef315

    God Bless we will contiue what you started

  • USMC


  • Top

    I am the Conde families Casualty Officer and I will tell the apple did not fall far from the tree.  Mr & Mrs Conde are to be commended for raising an exceptional young man.

    Rest Easy Sgt.  Mission complete, job well done!

  • Biggreen754x4

    RIP Sgt. Conde, it was an honor.

  • Trevorrendyns

    We say we honor these Marines, but it seems that we only do it during ceremonies. Jordan Hall, which is next door, has a picture of GySgt Jordan with a corner bent, and two errors on the citation. The first describes a Silver Star with. “V”, and the second has 1stBn, 2ndMar abbreviated like the half fraction (a autocorrection error 1/2 Marines are familiar with).

    These discrepancies were mentioned to the academy SgtMaj several times last year. Go look and I bet it still hasn’t been fixed. Makes me wonder where Conde Hall will be a few years from now.

  • Charles Robinson

    Semper Fi and God Bless Sgt Conde and his family.

  • Oxfordmass

    “Thank you” seems like such an understatement. You all are America’s Next Greatest Generation… and I thank you, each and every one – under all circumstances.

  • Nela de Aguiar-Mann

    God Bless … 

  • Nela de Aguiar-Mann

    God Bless !