Marines Magazine

The Official Magazine of the United States Marine Corps

Subscribe by RSS

Marines complete first unmanned landing support in Helmand province

Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 5 return from familiarizing themselves with the downward thrust of a Kaman K1200, or "K-MAX," unmanned helicopter during initial testing in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 22. Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2 pioneered the first unmanned, mid-flight external cargo hookups, and delivered approximately 6,000 pounds of gear in their first day of testing. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lisa Tourtelot)

HELMAND PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2, the “Night Owls,” made history in May when they completed the first “hot hookups” between landing support Marines on the ground and a hovering Kaman K1200, “K-MAX,” unmanned helicopter in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

In the nearly 20 years of its commercial and military use, no organization had ever attempted to hook cargo to the K-MAX while it was in unmanned flight.

A Kaman K1200, "K-MAX," unmanned helicopter with Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2 hovers over a cargo load in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 22. The squadron broke new ground with the platform by performing the first mid-flight, unmanned cargo hookups with landing support team Marines from Combat Logistics Battalion 5. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lisa Tourtelot)

“This was particularly important because it was a milestone in unmanned aviation,” said Maj. John Norton, the officer in charge of Cargo Resupply Unmanned Aircraft Systems with the Night Owls. “It’s a stepping stone to increasing our capabilities in the unmanned aviation spectrum.”

The K-MAX system has been in use largely in the Pacific Northwest logging industry and most recently, in testing with the Marine Corps. While its purpose has been external cargo movements, users relied on a pilot to bring the aircraft to an idle mode while on the ground, hook up the cargo and then take off unmanned, explained Norton.

“[The traditional method of external lifting] takes time and requires more personnel to operate,” said Norton. “With a hot hookup from the hover, we’re able to come into the zone more expeditiously, which gives us more time to go forward with the fuel supply on the aircraft.”

The landing support team Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 5 who participated in the groundbreaking training were no strangers to external cargo hookups, but working with an unmanned helicopter provided unfamiliar working conditions.

“Working with unmanned is a lot different,” said Sgt. Brianna Conte, a landing support team leader with CLB-5. “Usually when we’re working with a manned aircraft we have pilots and crew chiefs to look up to when we’re underneath the helicopter. With unmanned it’s not like that. We have the [air vehicle operator] and a spotter who are our eyes when we’re getting it all hooked up.”

The team of Marines broke ground for CLB-5, as well, being the first Marines to execute a hot hookup with a hovering unmanned helicopter.

“This is probably one of the best experiences I’ve had in the Marine Corps thus far,” said Conte. “I speak for my Marines when I say we were extremely excited. Not everyone can say they were the first ones to do something.”

The K-MAX is still in trials for use in the Marine Corps, but the platform has already moved more than one million pounds of cargo in six months of tests. On the first night of hot hookups, the squadron was able to move nearly 6,000 pounds of gear to Marines in remote locations.

“The possibilities this opens up for the Marine Corps is increasing our capabilities,” said Norton.

The Marine Corps has high hopes for the system, which moves cargo quicker and safer than a vehicle convoy on improvised explosive device-ridden roads.

Landing support team Marines with Combat Logistics Battalion 5 prepare to hook cargo to a hovering Kaman K1200, "K-MAX," unmanned helicopter in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 23. Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2 made history by being the first organization to test the K-MAX's ability to perform mid-flight, unmanned cargo hookups with Marines on the ground. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Lisa Tourtelot)

    Related Posts

  • Wounded Marines still in the fight

    August 20th, 2012 // By Cpl. Daniel Wetzel

    As the battlefield settled and the medevac carried Cpl. Brad Fite to Germany, medical personnel didn’t think he would survive. The damage was so extensive, Fite had to be resuscitated three times before landing. “They  [Read more...]

  • Future of Garmsir in Afghan Hands

    May 15th, 2012 // By Cpl. Reece Lodder

    America’s Battalion Completes Final Helmand Tour GARMSIR DISTRICT, Afghanistan — In the fall of 2004, the Marines and sailors of 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment began a challenging  journey that took them to the Middle  [Read more...]

  • Operation Tageer Shamal

    May 14th, 2012 // By Cpl. Reece Lodder

    GARMSIR DISTRICT, Helmand province, Afghanistan - The heart of Garmsir district is safe. For the past five years, coalition forces have operated with Afghan National Security Forces to defeat the insurgency in the central Helmand River  [Read more...]

  • Night Lights

    March 23rd, 2012 // By Cpl. Reece Lodder

    Pfcs. Greg Zecher and Nicholas Roberts, machine gunners with Lima Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, illuminate the night sky by firing tracer rounds from their weapons during Exercise Clear, Hold, Build 3 on Marine  [Read more...]

  • On Patrol

    March 15th, 2012 // By Cpl. Colby W. Brown

    A local Afghan goat farmer directs his herd around a convoy with 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment in the Garmsir district, Sept. 20, 2011. From Sept. 19 to 24, elements from Bravo and Hotel Company  [Read more...]

  • SemperFiMcJunkin

    I remember the final construction phase of this project being boarded by the Regional Command (SouthWest) Joint Facilities Utilization Board… I also remember what a crazy pain it was to get all the required synchronization for construction, funding, and am glad to see this has become a reality.

  • Airi Marin Pekasa

    Good Post

  • D-Bo

    This thing is junk.

    “On the first night of hot hookups, the squadron was able to move nearly 6,000 pounds of gear to Marines in remote locations.”

    We do that weight per load with JPADS. I can put out 16 CDS at once to multiple locations.  Aerial Delivery is the way to go.

  • Christopher Huber

    may the ro bot revolution commence *tinfoil hat*